Trent University

Heather Nicol

Heather┬áNicol’s research is focused upon exploring the dynamics that structure the political geography of the circumpolar North, with a specific focus on the North American Arctic and Canada-US relations. Her work is focused upon cross-border relations, tensions, geopolitical narratives and mappings of power and sovereignty. She is currently exploring both the history of circumpolar geopolitics, security and borders in relation to globalization and post-global paradigms.

Heather Nicol

Centre for Foreign Policy and Federalism

The Networked North: Borders and Borderlands in the Canadian Arctic Region

The Networked North identifies and addresses key lenses for understanding cross-border cooperation in the North American Arctic under conditions of globalization, climate change and changing international relations. Each chapter focuses upon a particular theme influencing cross border relationships, such as historical legacies, cultural relationships, cross-border flows of people and goods, security arrangements, governance practices and sustainability challenges. Twelve short chapters systematically define the ways in which Arctic and sub-Arctic borderlands are uniquely situated within processes of climate change, devolution, globalization, resurgent indigeneity, and neo-realist geopolitical processes. All authors acknowledge how the North has been reterritorialized by each of these processes in ways that encourage the networked nature of sovereignty and territoriality.

Journal of Borderland Studies Special Issue

Rescaling Borders of Investment: The Arctic Council and the Economic Development Policies

The Networked North identifies and addresses key lenses for understanding cross-border cooperation in the North American Arctic under conditions of globalization, climate change and changing international relations. Each chapter focuses upon a particular theme influencing cross border relationships, such as historical legacies, cultural relationships, cross-border flows of people and goods, security arrangements, governance practices and sustainability challenges. Twelve short chapters systematically define the ways in which Arctic and sub-Arctic borderlands are uniquely situated within processes of climate change, devolution, globalization, resurgent indigeneity, and neo-realist geopolitical processes. All authors acknowledge how the North has been reterritorialized by each of these processes in ways that encourage the networked nature of sovereignty and territoriality.