Books

We are constantly updating this page (Spring 2019).

All BIG funded research that has been published by a secondary publisher is listed below with links.

The First Century of the International Joint Commission

Murray Clamen and Daniel Macfarlane, (eds). (2020). The First Century of the International Joint Commission. University of Calgary Press: Calgary.

This open access book will be available for (free) download or (physical) purchase in December 2019.

The International Joint Commission oversees and protects the shared waters of Canada and the United States. Created by the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909, it is one of the world’s oldest international environmental bodies. A pioneering piece of transborder water governance, the IJC has been integral to the modern Canada-United States relationship.
This is the definitive history of the International Joint Commission. Separating myth from reality and uncovering the historical evolution of the IJC from its inception to its present, this collection features an impressive interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners. Examining the many aspects of border waters from east to west The First Century of the International Joint Commission traces the three major periods of the IJC, detailing its early focus on water flow, its middle period of growth and increasing politicization, and its modern emphasis on ecosystems.
Informative, detailed, and fascinating, The First Century of the International Joint Commission is essential reading for academics, contemporary policy makers, governments, and all those interested in sustainability, climate change, pollution, and resiliency along the Canada-US Border. 
 

The Networked North: Borders and Borderlands in the Canadian Arctic Region

Heather Nicol and P. Whitney Lackenbauer, eds. (2017). The Networked North: Borders and Borderlands in the Canadian Arctic Region. Edited book with Heather Nicol. Waterloo: Borders in Globalization/Centre on Foreign Policy and Federalism. vi, 198 pp.

The Networked North identifies and addresses key lenses for understanding cross-border cooperation in the North American Arctic under conditions of globalization, climate change and changing international relations. Each chapter focuses upon a particular theme influencing cross border relationships, such as historical legacies, cultural relationships, cross-border flows of people and goods, security arrangements, governance practices and sustainability challenges. Twelve short chapters systematically define the ways in which Arctic and sub-Arctic borderlands are uniquely situated within processes of climate change, devolution, globalization, resurgent indigeneity, and neo-realist geopolitical processes. All authors acknowledge how the North has been reterritorialized by each of these processes in ways that encourage the networked nature of sovereignty and territoriality.

 

 

Bordering on Brexit: Views from Local Communities in the Central Border Region of Ireland / Northern Ireland

Katy Hayward. (2017). Bordering on Brexit: Views from Local Communities in the Central Border Region of Ireland / Northern Ireland. Queen's University Belfast.

This report was produced by the Centre for International Borders Research, Queen’s University Belfast on behalf of the Irish Central Border Area Network (ICBAN) of local authorities in eight councils across both sides of the Irish border. The study used an online survey and focus groups to gather the views of citizens in the Central Border Region of Ireland/Northern Ireland regarding Brexit.