Borders, Politics and Policies: Using Data to Power Border Research

Strasbourg, France | June 3–4, 2024

In collaboration with the Transfrontier Euro-Institut Network (TEIN, Kehl, Germany) and the Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po Strasbourg, University of Strasbourg, France), Borders in Globalization is hosting an academic conference entitled ‘Borders, Politics, and Policies: Using Data to Power Border Research.’

The conference will be held in Strasbourg, France, on June 3rd and 4th, 2024. Conference Registration will be available at the end of March 2024.

We invite proposals for individual papers from academics across disciplines, which are utilizing innovative data to address the policy challenges shaping Europe’s internal and peripheral border policies through a comparative perspective. More information on how to apply can be found here.

The Jean Monnet Network ‘Human to Military Security Policies’ project takes as its premise that the ongoing migration crisis in Europe is the worst humanitarian crisis in decades and is forcing Europeans to face past and future issues about borders and security. The policy decisions being made now will have a long-standing impact on the European Union and are not only reshaping Europe’s internal and peripheral borders, but also Europe’s values of integration. Moreover, in this era of globalization, much of the policy process around humanitarian aid, migration, and security involve collaboration and cooperation across borders.

In light of this clear need for comparative, cross-border research, the Jean Monnet Network ‘Human to Military Security Policies’ project has been building a database, with the goal of collecting systematic and comprehensive data on European Integration across each internal and external border dyad from the perspective of human to military security in the EU. The database includes over 160 dyad pairs, where either one or both dyad countries is an EU member state. Data on a wide range of indicators and variables on the dyads covering all aspects of the human to security continuum, from defense spending to infrastructure continuity to tourism and trade.

More information on the databases projects is available here.

Borders, Politics and Policies: Using Data to Power Border Research