Good Governance: Assessment of Institutional Opportunities Between the European Union and Western Ukraine

Tatiana Shaban | BIG Research Reports | #40

Ukraine moved towards a closer relationship with the European Union (EU) which encouraged Ukraine’s participation in a number of cross border co-operation (CBC) programs. Besides, the country set up a regional development policy which intended to overcome the disparities between the northern and eastern territories against the Russian border and the western territories against the EU border. The aim of the paper is to characterise cooperation programs (CBC) of border regions in Western Ukraine and to find out institutional capacities and gaps to intensify cross-border cooperation with the EU in those regions.

Tatiana Shaban

Good Governance: Assessment of Institutional Opportunities Between the European Union and Western Ukraine

Institutional Opportunities for Cross-Border Cooperation Between the European Union and Ukraine in the Local Regional Context

Tatiana Shaban | BIG Research Reports | #41

The Eastern Partnership (EaP) was built on the frame of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) and designed to “accelerate political association and further economic integration” between the Union and partner countries. The policy was the first comprehensive initiative introduced into the system of the EU’s external relations, which designed to help neighbouring countries with their approximation to and integration with the EU rules and norms, based on a differentiated approach committed to supporting each partner country to progress in its own way and at its own speed. The EaP was developed with the aim to advance political dialogue and cooperation in a number of areas, including governance, trade, migration and border management, energy and the environment by setting up bilateral and multilateral projects and programs in areas of economic, political and cultural development with all EaP participants (except for Belarus).

Institutional Opportunities for Cross-Border Cooperation Between the European Union and Ukraine in the Local Regional Context

Brexit and the Northern Irish Borderlands: Fragile Progress Moving Towards Disintegration

Michael Buttazzoni | BIG Research Reports | #49

Northern Ireland is perhaps the most unassuming borderland region one can imagine. No natural or man-made impediments physically separate the Republic of Ireland from Northern Ireland (UK), and the international border runs a meandering 450 km route that divides the historic province of Ulster, several parishes, and occasionally individual households between the two sovereign states. With only a switch from imperial to metric signage to denote one’s position, the most significant division within the Northern Irish borderlands, instead, exists primarily within the minds of those who dwell there. Though the sectarian conflict between Catholic Nationalist and Protestant Unionist communities pre-dates the current border configuration – laid down only in 1921— by several centuries, the largely socio-economicimpact of Northern Ireland’s modern ‘bordering’ process pales in comparison to the human cost accumulated during the conflicts provoked by its ethno-political symbolism. The border, in this sense, is a tangible legacy of the region’s recent post-colonial past, whose present post-Brexit management will define the shape of its post-conflict future.

Michael Buttazzoni

Brexit and the Northern Irish Borderlands: Fragile Progress Moving Towards Disintegration

“States of Exception”: EU’s Relationship with De-facto States and Implications on Sovereignty, Citizenship, and Identity

Jay Ramasubramanyam | BIG Research Reports | #64

From ‘Brexit’ that resulted in the UK voting to leave the European Union to construction of border walls between EU states, where none existed before, in an attempt to curb refugees entering respective nations, efforts to assert national identity and pseudo-nationalism, has been on the rise in the recent years, due to perceived external threats. In the midst of such crises that have been framed as supposed threats to the integrity and sovereignty of individual EU states, fissures have emerged in the supranational identity that has often set apart the EU from the rest of the world. In the midst of such guardedness, where do states with limited recognition feature in EU’s assertion of regional sovereignty and identity? This paper will analyze the relationship between the EU and states with limited recognition or de-facto states and its implications on issues of sovereignty, identity and legal personality of such unrecognized states. I will attempt to examine the European community’s perception of a state’s validity and its impacts, in addition to analyzing whether “citizenship” in “non-states” is contingent upon their recognition by other states and whether individuals living in such states risk being rendered stateless.

Jay Ramasubramanyam