Seminar 9: Post-Modern Borders: Mutations: The EU

Certain authors have suggested that Europe is both a museum and a laboratory for borders. Is the European Community suppressing or weakening ‘‘territorial borders’’ and ‘‘legal borders’’ as ‘‘technical, physical and fiscal borders’’ are being redrawn? Could the European Union also be a laboratory for "inter-territorial" region(s)? In this seminar, we study the transformation of borders in the European Union.

Readings:

  • J. T. Leerssen, Europe as a set of borders. Yearbook of European Studies, 6, 1993, pp.1-14
  • Takle, M., « The Treaty of Lisbon and the European Border Control Regime », Journal of Contemporary European Research, 8 (3), 2012, pp. 280‐299.
  • T. Diez, The Paradoxes of Europe’s Borders, Comparative European Politics, 2006, 4, (235–252)
  • A. Cooper, Where Are Europe’s New Borders? Ontology, Methodology and Framing, Journal of Contemporary European Studies 23.4, 2015, pp.447-458

Researchers: Benjamin Perrier is a Post-Doctoral Scholar studying the evolution and conception of borders in the era of globalization. As a jurist interested in the Theory of Law, Cross-Border Law, Transnational Law and Global Law, Benjamin is a member of the international "Borders In Globalization” project.

Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly is a Full Professor in the School of Public Administration at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, where he holds a Jean Monnet Chair in Innovative Governance and serves as Director of the Jean Monnet European Union Center of Excellence. Dr. Brunet-Jailly also directs two large research programs: the Jean Monnet Network Comparing and Contrasting EU Border and Migration Policies and Borders in Globalization, a SSHRC Partnership grant. He is the author of nearly 90 articles and chapters, and eight books and special issues of scholarly journals in urban and border studies. His most recent book is a three-volume Encyclopaedia of Border Disputes, ABC Clio-Praeger (2014). He is the President Elect of the Association of Borderlands Studies.

This seminar will be held on February 12th, 2019, in room B007 of the Clearihue building at the University of Victoria. Please email borders[at]uvic[dot]ca to register.